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CHIN 100. Elementary Conversational Chinese I. 3 Hours U.

Three hours of class per week plus outside use of recorded text materials. Basic spoken language instruction intended primarily for beginners planning travel or work in China and Taiwan. Introduction to basic written characters. Does not fulfill College of Liberal Arts and Sciences foreign language distribution requirements or department major and minor requirements. LEC.

CHIN 101. Elementary Conversational Chinese II. 3 Hours U.

Continuation of CHIN 100. Prerequisite: CHIN 100 or equivalent. LEC.

CHIN 102. Beginning Chinese I. 4 Hours U.

Taught mainly in the summer, this course covers about 75% of the material in CHIN 104, upon which this course is modeled. LEC.

CHIN 104. Elementary Chinese I. 5 Hours U / F1.

Three hours of lecture and three hours of spoken drill each week. An introduction to spoken and written modern standard Chinese (Mandarin). Not open to students with native ability in Mandarin or Chinese dialect. Students who have any previous knowledge of Chinese must take a placement exam before enrolling in Chinese classes at K.U. Consult Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures for details. LEC.

CHIN 106. Elementary Chinese for Advanced Beginners. 3 Hours U.

This course is designed for students who have already acquired some elementary Chinese language abilities (in high school or from family), but cannot be placed in CHIN 108, Elementary Chinese II. The course focuses on perfecting listening, speaking, reading and writing skills, and prepares students for CHIN 108. For admission to the class, students must take the EALC Chinese placement exam, be interviewed by designated instructors, and approved. LEC.

CHIN 108. Elementary Chinese II. 5 Hours U / F2.                      

Continuation of CHIN 104. Prerequisite: CHIN 101, CHIN 104, or equivalent. LEC.

CHIN 148. Intensive Elementary Chinese. 10-12 Hours U / F1 / F2.

An accelerated one semester course in elementary Chinese, covering the material of CHIN 104 and CHIN 108. Classes meet for two hours of lecture and one hour of drill daily. Emphasis on spoken language with grammar and readings in selected texts. No prerequisite. LEC.

CHIN 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Chinese. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

 CHIN 204. Intermediate Chinese I. 5 Hours U / F3.

Continuation of CHIN 108. Three hours of lecture and three hours of spoken drill. Prerequisite: CHIN 108 or equivalent. LEC.

CHIN 206. Intermediate Chinese Conversation. 2 Hours U.

Practice in speaking, presentation of prepared talks, and guided discussions. This course is primarily used to award transfer credit and does not fulfill any portion of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement. Prerequisite: CHIN 204 or equivalent. FLD.

CHIN 208. Intermediate Chinese II. 5 Hours U / F4.

Continuation of CHIN 204. Prerequisite: CHIN 204. LEC.

CHIN 251. Reading and Writing Chinese I. 1-3 Hours H.

Designed for those who speak modern standard (Mandarin) Chinese but lack reading and writing skills. Focuses on acquiring knowledge of the Chinese writing system and preparing students for possible entry into advanced courses in Chinese, e.g. CHIN 504 (Advanced Modern Chinese I), or, after appropriate testing, for possible exemption from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement. Students should take the online Chinese placement exam and consult with the Chinese Language Program Coordinator. Enrollment by permission of the Chinese Language Program Coordinator only. LEC.

CHIN 252. Reading and Writing Chinese II. 1-3 Hours H.

Continuation of CHIN 251. Prerequisite: CHIN 251 or permission of the instructor. LEC.

CHIN 290. Accelerated Chinese. 3 Hours U.

Instruction in reading and writing Chinese for students who already possess a degree of oral/aural proficiency. This course will prepare students for enrollment in CHIN 504, Advanced Modern Chinese I. No prerequisites. Consent of instructor required. LEC.

CHIN 342. Introduction to Classical Chinese. 3 Hours H / FP.

An introduction to Classical Chinese through detailed analysis of short original passages from a variety of early Chinese texts. Students gain a foundation in the grammar and vocabulary of Classical Chinese, preparing them for CHIN 544. The course is offered at the 300 and 500 levels, with additional requirements for students taking the 500 level. Prerequisite: A basic knowledge of Chinese characters (e.g. from CHIN 108 or JPN 108) and consent of the instructor, or CHIN 208 or JPN 208. Not open to students who have completed CHIN 542. LEC.

CHIN 386. Advanced Chinese Conversation. 2 Hours U / FP.

Guided discussions designed to increase fluency and further improve pronunciation. Prerequisite: CHIN 504 or equivalent. LEC.

CHIN 498. Directed Readings in Chinese. 1-4 Hours H/W / FP.

Readings in Chinese on a subject selected by a student with the advice and direction of the instructor. Individual meetings and reports. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND.

CHIN 504. Advanced Modern Chinese I. 5 Hours H/W / FP.

Five hours of class and two of drill. Readings in selected modern Chinese literary texts and discussion in Chinese of recordings of stories and dramas. Prerequisite: CHIN 208 or equivalent. LEC.

CHIN 508. Advanced Modern Chinese II. 5 Hours H/W / FP.

Continuation of CHIN 504. Prerequisite: CHIN 504 or equivalent. LEC.

CHIN 512. Advanced Chinese I. 2 Hours H/W / FP.

Readings in modern Chinese texts on a variety of subjects and discussion in Chinese. Prerequisite: CHIN 218 or equivalent. LEC.

CHIN 513. Advanced Chinese II. 2 Hours H/W / FP.

Continuation of CHIN 512. Prerequisite: CHIN 512 or equivalent. LEC.

CHIN 542. Introduction to Classical Chinese. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

An introduction to Classical Chinese through detailed analysis of short original passages from a variety of early Chinese texts. Students gain a foundation in the grammar and vocabulary of Classical Chinese, preparing them for CHIN 544. The course is offered at the 300 and 500 levels, with additional requirements for students taking CHIN 542. Prerequisite: A basic knowledge of Chinese characters (e.g. from CHIN 108 or JPN 108) and consent of instructor, or CHIN 208 or JPN 208. Not open to students who have completed CHIN 342. LEC.

CHIN 544. Readings in Classical Chinese: _____. 3 Hours AE42/AE61 / H/W / FP.

Classical Chinese is the language of the most famous works of Chinese philosophy and most Chinese literature before the twentieth century. The course introduces readings from a specific philosophical school or literary genre, for example: Confucian Philosophical Texts, Daoist Philosophical Texts, Poetry, Ming/Qing fiction, etc. Prerequisite: CHIN 342 or CHIN 542 or consent of the instructor. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

CHIN 562. Modern Chinese Texts I. 3 Hours NW AE61 / H/W / FP.

Readings and interpretation of varied modern Chinese texts. Continued study of the language in the form of oral discussion and written reports. Prerequisite: CHIN 504 or equivalent. LEC.

CHIN 564. Modern Chinese Texts II. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

A continuation of CHIN 562 with materials of increasing difficulty. Prerequisite: CHIN 562. LEC.

CHIN 580. Introduction to Chinese Research Materials. 1 Hour U / FP.

An introduction to basic reference works in Chinese and Western languages, including dictionaries, encyclopedias, concordances, and bibliographies. Library organization and research methods will also be discussed. (Five week course.) Prerequisite: CHIN 208 or equivalent. LEC.

CHIN 598. Readings in: _____. 1-3 Hours H/W / FP.

Students will read selections from materials on a given topic or topics. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: CHIN 564 or permission of instructor. IND.

CHIN 690. Seminar in Chinese Texts. 1-3 Hours H/W / FP.

Varying topics with varying prerequisites. LEC.

CHIN 801. Directed Readings and Research in Chinese. 1-4 Hours / FP.

Advanced language training for the study of Chinese sources in the humanities or social science field of the student. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. RSH.

CHIN 880. Advanced Chinese Research Materials. 2 Hours / FP.

A detailed examination of various Chinese language reference works and research materials. Emphasis will be placed on the use of different types of reference works to carry out research strategies. Prerequisite: CHIN 504 or equivalent and CHIN 580. LEC.

EALC 105. Living Religions of the East. 3 Hours HR/NW AE42/GE3H / H/W.

A basic introduction to religion in India, China, and Japan with emphasis upon religions that affect the modern period. Not open to students who have taken REL 108/EALC 108. (Same as REL 106.) LEC.

EALC 108. Living Religions of the East, Honors. 3 Hours HR/NW AE42/GE3H / H.

A basic introduction to religion in India, China, and Japan with emphasis upon religions that affect the modern period. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. Not open to students who have taken REL 106/EALC 105. (Same as REL 108.) LEC.

EALC 121. Introduction to Contemporary China. 3 Hours NW AE42 / H.

An overview of contemporary Chinese culture and society since the economic reforms and opening up launched in 1978, through the study of changes in politics, the economy, society, culture and everyday life in China. The course is taught in English. No prior knowledge of Chinese language is required. LEC.

EALC 130. Myth, Legend, and Folk Beliefs in East Asia. 3 Hours NW AE42 / H/W.

A survey of the commonly held ideas about the beginning of the world, the role of gods and spirits in daily life, and the celebrations and rituals proper to each season of the year. The purpose of the course is to present the traditional world view of the peoples of East Asia. (Same as ANTH 293, REL 130.) LEC.

EALC 131. Myth, Legend, and Folk Beliefs in East Asia, Honors. 3 Hours NW / H/W.

A survey of the commonly held ideas about the beginning of the world, the role of gods and spirits in daily life, and the celebrations and rituals proper to each season of the year. The purpose of the course is to present the world view of the ordinary peoples of East Asia in contrast to their more sophisticated systems of philosophy that are better known to the Western world. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. LEC.

EALC 142. Ethics in Chinese Philosophy. 3 Hours AE51 / H.

How can ethical codes help us lead a better life? What principles of government will ensure an ordered and harmonious society? What responsibilities do we have to others and to the natural world? Thinkers in early China asked these questions and came to a variety of different conclusions, ranging from a goal of spontaneous harmony, to a rigid law-and-order ethic. Their ideas are still relevant today and in this course we will both survey these different ethical perspectives and also apply them to contemporary social, political, and environmental issues. LEC.

EALC 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in East Asian Languages and Cultures. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

EALC 198. Studies in: _____. 1-5 Hours H.

Special purpose subject in East Asia and contiguous regions. LEC.

EALC 231. Introduction to: _____. 1-3 Hours NW / H/W.

Topics are various aspects of Chinese and Japanese cultures. LEC.

EALC 298. Studies in: _____. 1-5 Hours H.

Special purpose subject in East Asia and contiguous regions. LEC.

EALC 301. Cultural Traditions of China, Inner Asia, and Tibet. 3 Hours NW / H.

This course acquaints the student with the broad outlines of the traditional cultures and literatures of China and the contiguous regions of Inner Asia and Tibet. Course materials include translations and discussions of oral tales, epics, poetry, novels, and biography, which explore the interaction between these regions and cultures as well as their continuities and disparities. The course is most appropriate for students with no background in Asian culture. LEC.

EALC 302. Cultural Traditions of Japan and Korea. 3 Hours NW / H/W.

A wide-ranging examination of the similarities and difference between Japanese and Korean culture through folklore, literature, film, and other texts. Format: Lecture and discussion. Designed for students with no background in Asian culture. LEC.

EALC 310. The Chinese Novel. 3 Hours H/W.

Reading and analysis of the form and types of Chinese novel, its beginnings and development to the present day. LEC.

EALC 312. Japan's Literary Legacy. 3 Hours H/W.

A survey of the major works of Japan's long literary heritage. Readings from such classics as the Tale of Genji, the world's first novel, No drama, and poetry will acquaint the student with one of the world's great literary traditions. (Not open to students with credit in EALC 712.) LEC.

EALC 314. Traditional Chinese Literature in Translation. 3 Hours H/W.

A general survey of representative literary works of major genres in traditional China. Lectures, assigned readings, and discussions in English. A knowledge of Chinese is not required. (Not open to students with credit in EALC 714.) LEC.

EALC 315. Survey of Japanese Film. 3 Hours NW AE42 / H.

This course surveys the major developments in and critical approaches to twentieth-century Japanese film. Focusing mostly on narrative films, the course introduces students to basic methodological issues in Japanese film history, especially questions of narrative, genre, stardom, and authorship. We examine Japanese cinema as an institution located within specific contexts focusing on the ways in which this institution shapes gender, race, class, ethnic and national identities. This course examines how patterns of distribution, exhibition, and reception have influenced film aesthetics and film style over the last century. Through secondary readings, lectures, and discussions students critically examine how Japanese cinema as an institution both responds to and intervenes in the social, cultural, and political history of twentieth century Japan. The course is offered at the 300 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. (Same as FMS 315.) LEC.

EALC 316. Modern Japanese Film and Fiction. 3 Hours AE42 / H/W.

A survey of major works of fiction and film in modern Japan. Topics include the social and spiritual challenges of modernization, urbanization, and the issues of race and national identity. Works by Akutagawa, Kawabata, Kurosawa, Ogai, Ozu, Soseki and Tanizaki and others are covered. Lectures, discussion, readings, and films in English. Knowledge of Japanese language is not required. This course is offered at the 300 and the 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. Not open to students who have completed EALC 716. LEC.

EALC 317. Contemporary Japanese Literature in Translation: 1945-Present. 3 Hours AE42 / H/W.

A survey of major literary works of Japan's post-war and contemporary eras. Topics include life during and after the war, the experience of the atomic bomb, and the postmodern landscape. Works by Dazai, Mishima, Oe, Abe, Murakami, and others will be covered. The course is offered at the 300 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. Not open to students who have completed EALC 717. LEC.

EALC 318. Modern Chinese Fiction and Film. 2-3 Hours AE42 / H/W.

A general survey of important Chinese fiction and film of the 20th century. Lectures, readings, and discussions in English. Knowledge of Chinese is not required. Not open to students with credit in EALC 518. This course is taught at the 300 and 500 levels with additional assignments at the 500-level. LEC.

EALC 319. Contemporary Chinese Fiction and Film. 3 Hours AE42 / H.

A general survey of important Chinese fiction and film from the late 20th century to the present. Lectures, readings, and discussions in English. A knowledge of Chinese is not required. (Not open to students with credit in EALC 519.) LEC.

EALC 320. Modern East Asia: Multiple Perspectives. 3 Hours NW / H.

A survey of the major political changes in China, Japan, Korea and Tibet in the 20th century. Students will learn about the changes that swept through East Asia as it rapidly modernized via documentary films and lectures and will study the impact of these changes on individuals by reading autobiographies. LEC.

EALC 328. The Body in Japan. 3 Hours H.

The course examines historical and cultural concepts of the body in Japan and then focuses upon the pivotal events of the last half-century as experienced through the body. Students are introduced to a wide range of extreme bodily experiences: the regimented body of wartime, the body irradiated by the atomic bomb, the body of malnutrition and national humiliation, possessed bodies, licentious bodies, creating life through the body, the aged body, self-immolation of the body, nurturing the body, beautifying the body, and others. The primary sources of investigation and discussion are novels written after the war, films, anthropological writings, and popular culture. All readings are in English. LEC.

EALC 330. Chinese Literature and Culture: Premodern Times. 3 Hours NW AE42 / H/W.

An examination of Chinese literature and culture from earliest times to the modern period. Not open to students who have taken EALC 530. This course is taught at the 300 and 500 levels with additional assignments at the 500-level. LEC.

EALC 331. Studies In: _____. 1-3 Hours H/W.

Topics in the Chinese and Japanese cultures. LEC.

EALC 332. Asian Literature in Translation: _____. 3 Hours NW / H/W.

Introduction to Asian culture and society through close reading and analysis of important works of Asian literature. Themes and issues to be focused upon will vary (e.g., traditional or modern literature of China, Japan, or Korea, and special topics of interest). Lecture and discussion format. Knowledge of Asian languages is not required. LEC.

EALC 333. Asian Literature in Translation, Honors: _____. 3 Hours NW / H/W.

Introduction to Asian culture and society through close reading and analysis of important works of Asian literature. Themes and issues to be focused upon will vary (e.g., traditional or modern literature of China, Japan, or Korea, and special topics of interest). Lecture and discussion format. Knowledge of Asian languages is not required. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. LEC.

EALC 340. Structure of Chinese. 3 Hours H.

A detailed study of the phonological and grammatical structure of Chinese and the interactions between language and culture. Depending on student interest, a unit on the pedagogy of teaching Chinese as a foreign language may also be included. Primarily for students who want a linguistic knowledge of the language rather than a practical command of it. Students taking the course at the 500 level will have more work required of them. LEC.

EALC 345. Chinese Cinema. 3 Hours H.

This course surveys representative Chinese films since the 1980s and their global reception. The most recent formalistic, industrial, and institutional developments of Chinese cinema are examined. Students view films, do secondary readings, and learn theories and methodologies of film studies. Lectures and class discussions also cover the socio-historical context of contemporary Chinese filmmaking. This course is taught at the 300 and 500-levels with additional assignments required at the 500-level. Prerequisite: Junior status, or permission of the instructor. Not open to students with credit in EALC 545. LEC.

EALC 350. Contemporary Japan. 3 Hours NW / U.

An exploration of the Japanese way of life, self-concepts, and world view through lecture, discussion, reading, and field trips to businesses, community organizations, and cultural sites. Offered only during the Summer Institute in Hiratsuka, Japan. LEC.

EALC 361. Colonial Korea. 3 Hours H.

This course examines the history, society, and culture of Korea from the end of Choson dynasty through the Colonial period (1910-1945) in its East Asian and global context. The course uses a multi-disciplinary approach, including history, anthropology, literature, and film. Not open to students with credit in EALC 561. LEC.

EALC 362. Post-Colonial Korea. 3 Hours H.

This course examines the history, society, and culture of South Korea from the time of its liberation from Japan in 1945 to the present in its East Asian and global context. The course uses a multi-disciplinary approach, including history, anthropology, literature, and film. Prerequisite: EALC 361 or EALC 561, or permission of the instructor. Not open to student with credit in EALC 562. LEC.

EALC 363. Gendered Modernity in East Asia. 3 Hours H.

This course explores rapidly changing gender relationships and the sense of being "modern" in East Asia by examining marriage and family systems, work, education, consumer culture, and geopolitics. The class seeks to understand how uneven state control over men and women shapes desires, practices, and norms and how men and women act upon such forces. Avoiding biological or social determinism, this course treats gender as an analytical category and examines how modern nation-states and global geopolitics are constituted and operated. (Same as ANTH 363 and WGSS 363.) LEC.

EALC 364. Peoples of Japan and Korea. 3 Hours NW / S/W.

An analysis of the cultural diversity and unity of the peoples of Japan and Korea. Emphasis on historical and ethnological relationships, social structure, and ethics. (Same as ANTH 364.) LEC.

EALC 365. Japanese People through Films. 3 Hours NW / S/W.

Japanese people's culture and society through an extensive examination of both documentary and feature films. Readings from social science fields and literature will be used--the former to supply a theoretical framework for the study of Japanese people and the latter to further the inquiry into the individual sentiment motivating actions. (Same as ANTH 365.) LEC.

EALC 366. The Life Cycle in Japanese Culture and Literature. 3 Hours NW / H/W.

A study of the Japanese people from birth to death: what it means to be born in a Japanese family, to grow up Japanese, and to die Japanese. Anthropological works and selections from Japanese literature and film will be used to examine ways in which Japanese people live through the critical periods in their life cycle. (Same as ANTH 366.) LEC.

EALC 368. The Peoples of China. 3 Hours NW / S/W.

An analysis of the cultural origin, diversity, and unity of the peoples of China. Emphasis on historical development, social structure, cultural continuity and change, and ethics. (Same as ANTH 368.) LEC.

EALC 370. Chinese Folk Belief. 3 Hours H/W.

A survey of the beliefs of the ordinary Chinese people throughout the centuries with regard to myths, the other world, festivals, and the gods. Prerequisite: A course dealing with China. LEC.

EALC 380. Popular Cultures of East Asia. 3 Hours NW / H.

This course examines the contemporary popular cultures of Korea, Japan, China, and Taiwan, with particular emphasis on relations between East Asia and North America. Students study the issue of globalization and how the transnational flow of commodities and culture affects local societies and individual identities. They learn to identify, describe, and analyze the cross-cultural content of popular cultural artifacts and modes of expression relating to East Asia. To this end, they explore in detail such subjects as: fashion, foodways, cinema, manga, soap operas, and punk rock. Not open to students who have taken EALC 580. LEC.

EALC 410. The Culture of Play in Japan. 3 Hours NW AE42 / N/W.

This course examines the phenomenon and manifestations of play in Japanese culture. Topics include but are not confined to: the philosophy of play, the semiotics of play, the places of play, the role of laughter, play in Japanese religion, simulation and performance, and play and competition. LEC.

EALC 411. The Culture of Play in Japan, Honors. 3 Hours NW AE42 / N/W.

This course examines the phenomenon and manifestations of play in Japanese culture. Topics include but are not confined to: the philosophy of play, the semiotics of play, the places of play, the role of laughter, play in Japanese religion, simulation and performance, and play and competition. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC.

EALC 412. Visual and Literary Culture in Modern Japan. 3 Hours H.

This course examines the interconnections between the evolution of modern Japanese literature and vision technologies such as painting, panoramas, magic lanterns, stereoscopes, photography, motion pictures, television, and computers. The course provides an overview of modern Japanese literature from the perspectives of the visual culture in which that literature was conceived. The course considers such authors as Higuchi, Soseki, Ogai, Shimazaki, Akutagawa, Tanizaki, Yokomitsu, Kawabata, and Abe. Not open to students who have completed EALC 612. LEC.

EALC 413. Asian Media Studies. 3 Hours H.

This course examines new and emerging media in East Asia and how the media industries of East Asia function. Using recent scholarship and industry data on contemporary cyberculture, music studies, and television industries of East Asia we examine how such factors as globalization, post-colonialism, censorship, emerging technology, and national media legislation affect regional and transnational media industries in Japan, South Korea, and Mainland China/Taiwan/Hong Kong. (Same as FMS 413.) LEC.

EALC 415. Ancient China. 3 Hours NW / H.

A survey of ancient Chinese culture to the Qin period. Major archaeological discoveries and the literary tradition are taken as the primary evidence through which a number of topics are introduced (for example: environment, food, writing, art, thought, ritual). A knowledge of Chinese is not required. The course is offered at the 400 and 600 levels, with additional assignments at the 600 level. Not open to students who have completed EALC 615. LEC.

EALC 418. Sexual Politics in Chinese Literature and Culture: Premodern Times. 3 Hours NW / H.

This course uses myth, literature, history, biography, and other documents to discuss sexual politics in China from ca 1500 B.C.E. to the end of the last dynasty in 1911. Topics include: emperors, empresses, and consorts, polygamy, prostitution, love, yin and yang cosmology, the art of the bedchamber, women's literature, and erotic literature. Recommended: A course in East Asian studies. Not open to students who have taken EALC 618. This course is taught at the 400 and 600 levels with additional assignments at the 600-level. LEC.

EALC 420. Daily Life in China From the Opium War to the Present. 3 Hours NW / H/W.

Daily life and issues of social and cultural interaction between China and Western nations from the Opium War to the present. Fiction, travel diary, historical sources, film, and personal accounts will make up course materials. LEC.

EALC 431. Studies in: _____. 1-3 Hours H/W.

Topics in the Chinese and Japanese traditions. LEC.

EALC 488. Senior Seminar in East Asian Languages and Cultures. 3 Hours AE61 / H/W.

Open to seniors majoring in East Asian Languages and Cultures or by consent of instructor. LEC.

EALC 498. Directed Readings in East Asian Languages and Cultures. 1-4 Hours AE61 / H/W.

Readings in English on an East Asian subject, selected by a student with the advice and direction of the instructor. Individual meetings and reports. Prerequisite: ECIV 104 or ECIV 304 and consent of instructor. IND.

EALC 499. Honors Thesis. 3 Hours AE61 / H/W.

Required of all students working for a degree with honors. May be repeated for a total of nine semester hours. IND.

EALC 508. Religion in China. 3 Hours NW AE42/GE3H / H/W.

Survey of religious thought and practice in China from the Shang to the People's Republic. (Same as REL 508.) LEC.

EALC 509. Religion in Japan. 3 Hours NW AE42/GE3H / H/W.

Survey of religious thought and practice in Japan from the Jomon period to the present. (Same as REL 509.) LEC.

EALC 510. Education in Japan. 3 Hours NW / N/W.

An investigation of the relationship between education and Japanese national and cultural identity as expressed in conceptions of childhood: philosophical and political positions underlying curricular and administrative policies, teachers' training, and pedagogical styles; the interface between education, "work," and the economy in general; and the theme of "internationalization," (kokusaika). The course is taught in English. LEC.

EALC 518. Modern Chinese Fiction & Film. 3 Hours AE42 / H.

A general survey of important Chinese fiction and film of the 20th century. Lectures, readings, and discussions in English. Knowledge of Chinese is not required. Not open to students with credit in EALC 318. This course is taught at the 300 and 500 levels with additional assignments at the 500-level. Prerequisite: An introductory East Asian studies course such as ECIV 104 or ECIV 304 or EALC 105; or consent of instructor. LEC.

EALC 519. Contemporary Chinese Fiction and Film. 3 Hours H.

A general survey of important Chinese fiction and film from the late 20th century to the present. Lectures, readings, and discussions in English. A knowledge of Chinese is not required. This course is taught at the 300 and 500 levels with additional assignments at the 500-level. Prerequisite: An introductory East Asian studies course such as ECIV 104 or ECIV 304 or EALC 105; or consent of instructor. (Not open to students with credit in EALC 319.) LEC.

EALC 520. Entrepreneurship in East Asia. 3 Hours NW / H.

An intensive examination of the history and current status of entrepreneurship in China, Japan, and other nations in East Asia. This course investigates the role of entrepreneurs in Asian economic development from the nineteenth century to the present, as well as the relation between entrepreneurship and Asian cultural traditions. The opportunities and challenges of entrepreneurship in East Asia today are also considered. (Same as HIST 640.) LEC.

EALC 527. Asian Theatre and Performance. 3 Hours NW / H/W.

A survey of traditional and modern theatre and performance in Asia, with greatest attention given to India, China, and Japan. A study of plays, dramatic genres, history, conventions of play production, and acting styles and other performance forms. (Same as THR 527). LEC.

EALC 530. Chinese Literature and Culture: Premodern Times. 3 Hours NW AE42 / H/W.

An examination of Chinese literature and culture from earliest times to the modern period. This course is taught at the 300 and 500 levels with additional assignments at the 500-level. Prerequisite: An introductory East Asian studies course, such as ECIV 104 or ECIV 304 or EALC 105; or consent of the instructor. Not open to students with credit in EALC 330. LEC.

EALC 541. Asian Film. 3 Hours NW AE42 / H.

Seminar on various national film cultures of East and Southeast Asia. Representative films are studied from formal, stylistic, and socio-historic perspectives. Addresses the 12 impact of key cultural, economic, and political issues on each film industry. Class discussion, reports, and individual research papers. The course is offered at the 500 and 800 levels, with additional assignments at the 800 level. (Same as FMS 541.) Prerequisite: Junior status. LEC.

EALC 543. Contemporary Japanese Film. 3 Hours NW AE42 / H.

Seminar on the major developments in the contemporary (1980-present) Japanese film industry examining how filmmaking practices and film criticism have been influenced by such issues as transnationalism, post-colonialism, critical race theory, postmodernism, and new media. We survey recent industrial and stylistic trends as well as key critical debates. Class discussion, reports, and individual research papers. The course is offered at the 500 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. (Same as FMS 543.) Prerequisite: Junior status. LEC.

EALC 545. Chinese Cinema. 3 Hours H.

This course surveys representative Chinese films since the 1980s and their global reception. The most recent formalistic, industrial, and institutional developments of Chinese cinema are examined. Students view films, do secondary readings, and learn theories and methodologies of film studies. Lectures and class discussions also cover the socio-historical context of contemporary Chinese filmmaking. This course is taught at the 300 and 500-levels with additional assignments required at the 500-level. Prerequisite: Junior status, or permission of the instructor. Not open to students with credit in EALC 345. LEC.

EALC 555. Buddhists and Buddhism in China. 3 Hours NW AE42 / H.

A reading and media-rich survey of institutional, ritual, literary, educational, and exegetical practices that have shaped the lives of Buddhists in China, past and present. Alterities within the Buddhist tradition, and interactions with other religious options, are considered. (Same as REL 555.) LEC.

EALC 561. Colonial Korea. 3 Hours H.

This course examines the history, society, and culture of Korea from the end of the Choson dynasty through the colonial period (1920-1945) in its East Asian and global context. The course uses a multi-disciplinary approach, including history, anthropology, literature and film. Prerequisite: An introductory East Asian studies course, such as ECIV 104 or ECIV 304, or EALC 105; or consent of instructor. There are additional readings and more extensive writing assignments than in EALC 361. Not open to students with credit in EALC 361. LEC.

EALC 562. Post-Colonial Korea. 3 Hours H.

This course examines the history, society, and culture of South Korea from the time of its liberation from Japan in 1945 to the present in its East Asian and global context. The course uses a multi-disciplinary approach, including history, anthropology, literature, and film. Prerequisite: EALC 361 or EALC 561, or permission of the instructor. There are additional readings and more extensive writing assignments than in EALC 362. Not open to students with credit in EALC 362. LEC.

EALC 563. Cultural History of Korea. 3 Hours H.

This course examines the cultural history of Korea in periods prior to the 19th Century. Special attention is given to varying constructions of cultural value, heritage, and identity, together with the historically specific factors that engendered them. (Same as HIST 590.) LEC.

EALC 564. Modern Korean Culture and Society. 3 Hours H.

This course examines the history, society, values, and political economy of Korea in its East Asian and global context. The course uses multi-disciplinary approaches, including those of history, anthropology, literature and film. Prerequisite: An introductory course in East Asian studies, or permission of instructor. LEC.

EALC 565. Popular Images in Japanese Culture, Literatures, and Films. 3 Hours NW / S/W.

The course examines recurring themes and images in Japanese culture through films, literary works, and anthropological and other social science literature. These themes and images are studied in the contexts of both modern and traditional cultures. Although the popular deviates from the orthodox, nevertheless, the energy and pervasiveness of these offspring enforce and sustain "proper" cultural values. As a result of exploration of both highways and backroads of cultural expression, a holistic picture of Japanese ethos will emerge. (Same as ANTH 565. ) LEC.

EALC 567. Japanese Ghosts and Demons. 3 Hours NW / S/W.

An investigation of deeply rooted Japanese beliefs about intimate relationships among humans, animals, and nature - beliefs which help to explain the mysterious and to lend order to the world. Anthropological works, selections from Japanese literature, historical documents, artworks, and films will be used to examine supernatural themes. (Same as ANTH 567.) LEC.

EALC 570. The Structure of Japanese. 3 Hours H.

A detailed study of the phonological and grammatical structure of Japanese and the use of the language in social/cultural contexts. Primarily for students who want a linguistic knowledge of the language rather than a practical command of it. (Same as LING 570.) LEC.

EALC 572. The Structure of Chinese. 3 Hours AE42 / H.

A detailed study of the phonological and grammatical structure of Chinese and the interactions between language and culture. Depending on student interests, a unit on the pedagogy of teaching Chinese as a foreign language may also be included. Primarily for students who want a linguistic knowledge of the language rather than a practical command of it. (Same as LING 572.) LEC.

EALC 575. Love, Sexuality and Gender in Japanese Literature. 3 Hours H.

An examination of Japanese attitudes toward love, sexuality, and gender differences as revealed in literature from the tenth century to the present. Discussion format. LEC.

EALC 578. Gender and Society in Modern China. 3 Hours H.

This course examines gender politics and social institutions in modern China by examining important literary works and films from the Republican era (1911-1949), the Maoist era (1949-1976), and the post-Mao era (1976-present). Secondary readings are also supplied. All the readings are in English. No knowledge of Chinese is required. Prerequisite: An introductory East Asian studies course such as ECIV 104. ECIV 304, or EALC 105; or consent of the instructor. LEC.

EALC 580. Popular Cultures of East Asia. 3 Hours NW / H.

This course examines the contemporary popular cultures of Korea, Japan, China, and Taiwan, with particular emphasis on relations between East Asia and North America. Students study the issue of globalization and how the transnational flow of commodities and culture affects local societies and individual identities. They learn to identify, describe, and analyze the cross-cultural content of popular cultural artifacts and modes of expression relating to East Asia. To this end, they explore in detail such subjects as: fashion, foodways, cinema, manga, soap operas, and punk rock. More extensive writing requirements than 380. Not open to students who have taken EALC 380. LEC.

EALC 583. Imperial China. 3 Hours NW / H/W.

An intensive survey of China's traditional civilization and its history, with emphasis on the last centuries of imperial rule under the Sung, Yuan, Ming, and Ch'ing dynasties (to 1850). (Same as HIST 583.) LEC.

EALC 584. Modern China. 3 Hours NW AE42 / H/W.

An intensive survey of China's history from the early 19th century to the present. Key topics include the decline of the traditional system, the rise of communism, the Maoist era, and the tensions of change and control in the 1980s and 1990s. (Same as HIST 584.) LEC.

EALC 585. Reform in Contemporary China. 3 Hours NW AE42 / H/W.

Examines the epochal changes that have occurred in China from Deng Xiaoping's rise to power in 1978 to the present. Includes a focus on the historical background of the revolutionary period before examining the political and economic changes that spawned the 1989 "prodemocracy" movement at Tiananmen. The course includes an analysis of the events of the 1990s focusing on U.S.-China political and economic relations and the destabilizing effects of inflation, infrastructural reform, political and economic decentralization, and leadership succession. A previous course on China is helpful, but not mandatory. (Same as POLS 668.) LEC.

EALC 587. Early Modern Japan. 3 Hours NW AE42 / H/W.

Early modern Japan (16th to 19th century) examines the history, culture, and patterns of life during an era of rigid social control but artistic brilliance. After an historical overview of the period, students will explore topics including the social structure, travel, religion, thought, and the formation of traditional cultural forms such as Kabuki theater. (Same as HIST 587.) LEC.

EALC 588. Japan, 1853-1945. 3 Hours NW / H/W.

This course provides an intensive survey of Japanese history from the arrival of Commodore Perry through the Pacific War. Social, economic, and political themes will be emphasized. Among the topics covered will be the Meiji Restoration, industrialization, Japanese imperialism, Taisho democracy, and wartime mobilization. (Same as HIST 588.) LEC.

EALC 589. Japan Since 1945. 3 Hours NW / H/W.

This course provides an overview of Japanese history from the end of World War II to the present day. Among the topics covered will be the Allied Occupation, postwar politics and social change, the economic "miracle," popular culture, women and the family, crime and punishment, the educational system, and Japan's place in the world. (Same as HIST 589.) LEC.

EALC 590. Topics in East Asian Languages and Cultures: _____. 1-9 Hours H/W.

Specific topical courses will be offered every year covering a number of disciplines. Credit, description, and prerequisites will vary. Note: May be repeated for credit up to the stated limit. LEC.

EALC 591. Topics in East Asian Languages and Cultures: _____. 1-9 Hours S/W.

Specific topical courses will be offered every year covering a number of disciplines. Credit, descriptions, and prerequisites will vary. Note: May be repeated for credit up to the stated limit. LEC.

EALC 593. Modern Korea. 3 Hours NW / H/W.

This course will examine selected topics in Modern Korean history in the 19th and 20th centuries, with special emphasis on Korea's connections to China and Japan. (Same as HIST 593.) Prerequisite: A college-level course in East Asian history or culture, or consent of instructor. LEC.

EALC 596. Defining Japan: Marginalized Groups and the Construction of National Identity. 3 Hours NW / H/W.

This course investigates the construction of national identity in modern Japan by examining the historical experiences of groups marginalized by mainstream society. We will explore the pressures of conformity, the pervasiveness of social ostracism and the surprising diversity in Japanese society. Among the groups discussed will be indigenous peoples (the Ainu, Okinawans), the Korean minority, the outcast class (burakumin), the sick and disabled, the Yakuza, and political activists. (Same as HIST 596.) LEC.

EALC 597. Japanese Theater History. 3 Hours NW / H/W.

This course examines the historical development and characteristics of Japanese theater, with special attention to traditional theater and the genres of noh, kyogen, and kabuki in particular, tracing their origins in the pre-modern era and their continued performance today. To gain an understanding of the historical and artistic setting of these arts, lectures and readings will consider broader issues such as performance and ritual in religion and daily life, gender and representation, and folk theater. A portion of this class will include practical studies of theatrical forms including noh dance and kabuki music (shamisen). (Same as HIST 597.) LEC.

EALC 598. History and Structure of the Japanese Language. 3 Hours H/W.

The historical development of Japanese. Study of Japanese phonology, morphology and syntax, using the techniques of descriptive linguistics and generative grammar. Prerequisite: An introductory course in linguistics or one year of Japanese. LEC.

EALC 600. Biography of a City: _____. 3 Hours H/W.

This interdisciplinary, team-taught course surveys the artistic, intellectual, and historical development of some of the great cities of the world, such as Kyoto or Tokyo. LEC.

EALC 612. Visual and Literary Culture in Modern Japan. 3 Hours H.

This course examines the interconnections between the evolution of modern Japanese literature and vision technologies such as painting, panoramas, magic lanterns, stereoscopes, photography, motion pictures, television, and computers. The course provides an overview of modern Japanese literature from the perspectives of the visual culture in which that literature was conceived. The course considers such authors as Higuchi, Soseki, Ogai, Shimazaki, Akutagawa, Tanizaki, Yokomitsu, Kawabata, and Abe. There will be additional assignments for students in 612. Not open to students who have completed EALC 412. LEC.

EALC 615. Ancient China. 3 Hours NW / H/W.

A survey of ancient Chinese culture to the Qin period. Major archaeological discoveries and the literary tradition will be taken as the primary evidence through which a number of topics are introduced (for example: environment, food, writing, art, thought, ritual). A knowledge of Chinese is not required. The course is offered at the 400 and 600 levels, with additional assignments at the 600 level. Not open to students who have completed EALC 415. LEC.

EALC 618. Sexual Politics in Chinese Literature and Culture: Premodern Times. 3 Hours NW / H.

This course uses myth, literature, history, biography, and other documents to discuss sexual politics in China from ca 1500 B.C.E. to the end of the last dynasty in 1911. Topics include: emperors, empresses, and consorts, polygamy, prostitution, love, yin and yang cosmology, the art of the bedchamber, women's literature, and erotic literature. Prerequisite: A course in East Asian studies. Not open to students who have taken EALC 418. This course is taught at the 400 and 600 levels with additional assignments at the 600-level. LEC.

EALC 620. Daily Life in China from the Opium War to the Present. 3 Hours NW / H/W.

Daily life and issues of social and cultural interaction between China and Western nations from the Opium War to the present. Fiction, travel diary, historical sources, film, and personal accounts will make up course materials. LEC.

EALC 636. Women in Japanese Literature. 3 Hours H/W.

An examination of women as subjects, readers, and writers of Japanese literature. Topics may include images and stereotypes of women in Japanese literature; feminist readings of this literature; female culture; and the psychodynamics of female creativity. LEC.

EALC 642. Chinese Thought. 3 Hours NW AE42/GE3H / H/W.

A survey of the principal modes of Chinese thought from their origins through the imperial period. Not open to students with credit in EALC 132. (Same as HWC 524 and PHIL 506.) Prerequisite: Eastern civilizations course or a course in Asian history or a distribution course in philosophy. LEC.

EALC 646. Chinese Law. 3 Hours H/W.

The history and development of civil and criminal law in China from its beginnings until the present. The course will be taught both by lectures and by discussion of cases. A section of the course will concern modern Chinese law. Prerequisite: A course on China, or general background in law or business. LEC.

EALC 649. Doing Business With China: Law and Policy. 3 Hours NW / H/W.

A study of the issues involved in doing business with China. The current Chinese political and economic context will be examined, followed by a study of the Chinese legal system and Chinese economic law and regulation. Relevant U.S. law will also be considered. Prerequisite: A course on China, or general background in law or business. LEC.

EALC 656. Government and Politics of East Asia. 3 Hours NW AE42 / S/W.

A comparative examination of the contemporary political institutions, processes and ideas of China, Japan, and Korea. (Same as POLS 656.) Prerequisite: Junior level or consent of the instructor. LEC.

EALC 666. Political Economy of East Asia. 3 Hours S.

This course provides basic understanding of fiscal, monetarist, and trade policies; how governments in East Asia use them to pursue growth; the extent to which these governments follow or controvert economics to pursue growth; and how the performances of economies in East Asia relate to the US and global economies. (Same as POLS 666.) Prerequisite: POLS 150. LEC.

EALC 676. International Relations of Asia. 3 Hours S/W.

An intensive study of the problems of ideological conflict, diplomatic relations, strategic arrangements, economic cooperation, and cultural exchange in East and Southeast Asia with special emphasis upon the roles of major world powers. (Same as POLS 676.) Prerequisite: Sophomore level or consent of the instructor. LEC.

EALC 678. Chinese Foreign Policy. 3 Hours S/W.

In-depth examination of China's changing policies toward other countries with special emphasis on policy-making process, negotiating behavior, military strategy, economic relations, and cultural diplomacy. (Same as POLS 678.) Prerequisite: Sophomore level or consent of the instructor. LEC.

EALC 700. Introduction to East Asian Studies. 1 Hour.

Required of all M.A. students in the Department regardless of concentration. Introduction to resources in East Asian languages and literature. LEC.

EALC 701. Practicum in Teaching Chinese. 1 Hour.

This course is required every semester for graduate teaching assistants in the Chinese language program in EALC. The course will cover applicable second language acquisition theories and principles of foreign language pedagogy and focus on teaching methodologies, instructional techniques, and development of pedagogical materials specific to the Chinese classroom. This class will be conducted in a seminar format. Prerequisite: Teaching appointment in the East Asian Languages and Cultures department. SEM.

EALC 702. Practicum in Teaching Japanese. 1 Hour.

This course is required every semester for graduate teaching assistants in the Japanese language program in East Asian Languages and Cultures. The course will cover applicable second language acquisition theories and principles of foreign language pedagogy and focus on teaching methodologies, instructional techniques, and development of pedagogical materials specific to the, Japanese language classroom. This class will be conducted in a seminar format. Prerequisite: Teaching appointment in the East Asian Languages and Cultures department. SEM.

EALC 703. Practicum in Teaching Korean. 1 Hour.

This course is required every semester for graduate teaching assistants in the Korean language program in East Asian Languages and Cultures. The course will cover applicable second language acquisition theories and principles of foreign language pedagogy and focus on teaching methodologies, instructional techniques, and development of pedagogical materials specific to the Korean language classroom. This class will be conducted in a seminar format. Prerequisite: Teaching appointment in the East Asian Languages and Cultures department. SEM.

EALC 704. Contemporary East Asia. 3 Hours.

This graduate seminar explores rapidly changing societies in contemporary East Asia, particularly China, Japan, and Korea. The course provides a critical overview of East Asia and its diversity and complexity using cross-cultural perspectives and interdisciplinary social science approaches, and situates East Asian societies in the context of globalization. (Same as CEAS 704.) LEC.

EALC 712. Readings in Traditional Japanese Literature. 3 Hours.

A survey of Japanese literature from earliest times to 1868. Students will study the major writers in each genre, with special emphasis on an individual research topic. A knowledge of Japanese is not required. (Not open to students with credit in EALC 312.) LEC.

EALC 714. Readings in Traditional Chinese Literature. 3 Hours.

A general survey of representative literary works of major genres in traditional China. Lectures, assigned readings, and discussions in English. A knowledge of Chinese is not required. (Not open to students with credit in EALC 314.) LEC.

EALC 715. Survey of Japanese Film. 3 Hours.

This course surveys the major developments in patterns of distribution, exhibition, and reception and their influence on film aesthetics in twentieth century Japanese film. Through secondary readings, lectures, and discussions students will examine how Japanese cinema as an institution responds to and intervenes in the social, cultural, and political history of twentieth century Japan. The course is offered at the 300 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. (Same as FMS 715.) LEC.

EALC 716. Fiction and Film in Japan. 3 Hours.

A survey of major works of fiction and film in modern Japan. Topics include the social and spiritual challenges of modernization, urbanization, and the issues of race and national identity. Works by Akutagawa, Kawabata, Kurosawa, Ogai, Ozu, Soseki and Tanizaki and others will be covered. Lectures, discussion, readings, and films in English. Knowledge of Japanese language is not required. This course is offered at the 300 and the 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. Not open to students who have completed EALC 316. LEC.

EALC 717. Contemporary Japanese Literature in Translation: 1945-Present. 3 Hours.

A survey of major literary works of Japan's post-war and contemporary eras. Topics include life during and after the war, the experience of the atomic bomb, and the postmodern landscape. The course is offered at the 300 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. An individual research project in an area of the student's special interest will be required. Not open to students who have completed EALC 317. LEC.

EALC 718. Readings in Modern Chinese Literature. 2-3 Hours.

A general survey of the important writers of the 20th century and their works. Lectures, readings, and discussions in English. A knowledge of Chinese is not required. (Not open to students with credit in EALC 318.) LEC.

EALC 728. The Body in Japan. 3 Hours.

The course examines historical and cultural concepts of the body in Japan and then focuses upon the pivotal events of the last half-century as experienced through the body. Students will be introduced to a wide range of extreme bodily experiences: the regimented body of wartime, the body irradiated by the atomic bomb, the body of malnutrition and national humiliation, possessed bodies, licentious bodies, creating life through the body, the aged body, self-immolation of the body, nurturing the body, beautifying the body, and others. The primary sources of investigation and discussion will be novels written after the war, films, anthropological writings, and popular culture. All readings will be in English. This course is offered at the 300 and the 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. Prerequisite: Upper division or graduate status. LEC.

EALC 732. Seminar in Eastern Religious Thought: _____. 3 Hours.

Analysis of the religious thought of selected thinkers of India, China, and/or Japan, traditional and modern. May be taken more than once if subject matter varies sufficiently. (Same as REL 762.) Prerequisite: REL 507, REL 508, REL 509, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

EALC 733. Seminar in Eastern Religious Texts: _____. 3 Hours.

Analysis of a selected religious text or texts from India, China, or Japan, in translation. May be taken more than once if subject matter varies sufficiently. (Same as REL 733.) Prerequisite: REL 507, REL 508, REL 509, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

EALC 743. Contemporary Japanese Film. 3 Hours.

Seminar on the major developments in the contemporary (1980-present) Japanese film industry examining how filmmaking practices and film criticism have been influenced by such issues as transnationalism, postcolonialism, critical race theory, postmodernism, and new media. We will survey recent industrial and stylistic trends as well as key critical debates. Class includes discussion, reports, and individual research papers. This course is offered at the 500 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. (Same as FMS 743.) SEM.

EALC 747. East Asian History and Culture for Teachers. 2 Hours.

An advanced survey of the history, culture, and contemporary affairs of , China, Japan and Korea, specifically designed for K-12 educators who wish to incorporate East Asian topics into their classroom teaching. Pedagogical methods and resources for the study of East Asia will be emphasized. Topics covered will address relevant benchmarks in the state curricular standards in social studies, themes from the Advanced Placement world history examination, and the national standards in world history. (Same as HIST 747.) Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor. LEC.

EALC 762. Readings in Japanese Religion. 3 Hours.

A high-level introduction to the traditional religions of Japan, with special emphasis on Japanese Buddhism. Texts to be used will include translations of original documents as well as secondary studies. Those students who have competence in Japanese will be required to do some readings in that language, but a knowledge of the language is not a prerequisite. LEC.

EALC 764. Modern Korean Culture and Society. 3 Hours.

An examination of the history, society, values, and political economy of Korea in its East Asian and global context. The course will use a multi-disciplinary approach, including history, ethnography, fiction and film. LEC.

EALC 766. Japanese People: Their Culture and Literature. 3 Hours.

A study of Japanese people's life cycle through a combination of theoretical social scientific observations of Japanese as a cultural group and personal literary descriptions of them. An individual research paper is required. (Not open to students with credit in EALC 366.) LEC.

EALC 776. Seminar in Religion and Society in Asia: _____. 3 Hours.

Analysis of selected Asian religions and their relationships to selected Asian societies. May be taken more than once if subject matter varies sufficiently. (Same as REL 776.) Prerequisite: REL 507, REL 508, REL 509, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

EALC 790. Topics in East Asian Languages and Cultures: _____. 1-3 Hours.

Special topical courses covering a number of disciplines. Credit descriptions and prerequisites will vary. NOTE: May be repeated for up to 12 total credits. RSH.

EALC 801. Directed Readings. 1-5 Hours.

Designed to meet the needs of advanced students whose study in East Asian studies cannot be met with regular courses. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. RSH.

EALC 841. Asian Film. 3 Hours.

Seminar on various national film cultures of East and Southeast Asia. Representative films are studied from formal, stylistic, and socio-historic perspectives. Addresses the impact of key cultural, economic and political issues on each film industry. Class includes discussion, reports, and individual research papers. This course is offered at the 500 and 800 levels, with additional assignments at the 800 level. (Same as FMS 841.) SEM.

EALC 888. Contemporary China Studies. 3 Hours.

This course will review and analyze the current literature on China's social and political development, including a wide range of topics within political science. There is a rich body of literature within each topic such as civil society in China, legal reform, political culture, nationalism, gender issues, ethnicity, political behavior, elections, economic development, and inequality. This course will introduce key literature within each topic focusing on the debates among China scholars as well as how these debates fit in the general field of political science. (Same as GIST 888 and POLS 888.) Prerequisite: POLS 668 or permission of the instructor. LEC.

EALC 899. Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

An inquiry into the source material upon a specific subject. THE.

ECIV 104. Eastern Civilizations. 3 Hours HL/NW AE42 / H/W.

This course acquaints the student with the broad outlines of the traditional cultures and literatures of East Asia, and explores the interaction between these regions and cultures as well as their continuities and disparities. Course materials include translations and discussions of original sources. The course is most appropriate for students with no background in Asian culture. Does not complete major requirement. Not open to students with credit in ECIV 304. LEC.

ECIV 105. Eastern Civilizations Honors. 3 Hours HL/NW AE42 / H/W.

An introductory course designed to acquaint the student with the broad outlines of the traditional cultures and literatures of East Asia. By reading translations of original source materials, the student is able to see the interaction among the various cultures as well as their essential continuity. The course is most appropriate for students without any background in Asian culture. Offered for students with superior academic records. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. LEC.

ECIV 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Eastern Civilization. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

ECIV 304. Eastern Civilizations. 3 Hours HL/NW AE42 / H/W.

This course acquaints the student with the broad outlines of the traditional cultures and literatures of East Asia, and explores the interaction between these regions and cultures as well as their continuities and disparities. Course materials include translations and discussions of original sources. The course is most appropriate for students with no background in Asian culture. Not open to students with credit in ECIV 104. If majoring in EALC and have completed ECIV 104, see major advisor about completing the ECIV 304 major requirement. LEC.

ECIV 305. Eastern Civilizations Honors. 3 Hours HL/NW AE42 / H/W.

An introductory course designed to acquaint the student with the broad outlines of the traditional cultures and literatures of East Asia. By reading translations of original source materials, the student is able to see the interaction among the various cultures as well as their essential continuity. The course is most appropriate for students without any background in Asian culture. Similar to ECIV 304, but reading and writing assignments reflect the fact that this is an honors course. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. LEC.

HNDI  110 - Beginning Hindi I  5 Hours

An introduction to modern standard Hindi that emphasizes acquisition of basic language skills (speaking, comprehension, reading and writing) through a combination of lecture, drill, and work with the Devanagari script. 

HNDI  120 - Beginning Hindi II  5 Hours

A continuation of Beginning Hindi I that builds on basic skills of speaking and comprehension, and the writing and reading of the Devanagari script developed in Beginning Hindi I.  Prerequisite:  HNDI 110 or placement exam that establishes a level of proficiency in Hindi suited to Beginning Hindi II.  

HNDI  177 - First Year Seminar:  _____  3 Hours

Students enrolling in this course should be in their initial semester at KU. 

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Hungarian.  Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core.  First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience.  Prerequisite:  First-time freshman status. 

HNDI  210 - Intermediate Hindi I  3 Hours

Enhancement of speaking, comprehension, reading and writing abilities in modern standard Hindi, with emphasis on grammar.  Readings will be introduced from representative genres of Hindi literature.  Prerequisite:  HNDI 120 or placement exam that establishes a level of proficiency in Hindi suited to Intermediate Hindi I. 

HNDI  220 - Intermediate Hindi II  3 Hours

Enhancement of speaking, comprehension, reading and writing abilities in modern standard Hindi, with emphasis on grammar.  Readings will be introduced from representative genres of Hindi literature.  Prerequisite:  HNDI 210 or placement exam that establishes a level of proficiency in Hindi suited to Intermediate Hindi II. 

HNDI  301 - Topics in Hindi Culture, Language and Literature:  _____  Hours 3

Investigation of special topics on Hindi culture, language and literature at the undergraduate level.  May be repeated for credit when topic varies. 

HNDI  310 - Advanced Hindi I 3  Hours

Enhancement of speaking, comprehension, reading and writing abilities in Hindi.  Readings are introduced from representative genres of Hindi literature. Prerequisite:  HNDI 220 or placement exam that establishes a level of proficiency in Hindi suited to Advanced Hindi I. 

HNDI  320 - Advanced Hindi II  3 Hours

Enhancement of speaking, comprehension, reading and writing abilities in Hindi.  Readings are introduced from representative genres of Hindi literature. Prerequisite:  HNDI 310 or placement exam that establishes a level of proficiency in Hindi suited to Advanced Hindi II. 

HNDI  593 - Directed Study in Hindi Culture and Literature:  _____  1-3 Hours

This course is designed for students seeking proficiency in Hindi beyond HNDI 320.  Instructor will direct the student through readings and materials in Hindi that will add to the students substantive knowledge of India and culture in the Hindi language.  May be taken multiple semesters for credit with varying content.  Prerequisite:  HNDI 320, and consent of instructor. 

JPN 100. Beginning Japanese I. 3 Hours U.

An introduction to Japanese. Familiarity with the basic structural patterns of the language through conversation is stressed. The hiragana and katakana syllabaries are introduced and a few characters are learned. Usually offered as part of a Summer Study Abroad Program. LEC.

JPN 101. Beginning Japanese II. 3 Hours U.

Continuation of JPN 100. Available to students who took JPN 100 as part of the Summer Study Abroad Program. Not available for credit for students who have previously completed JPN 104. Prerequisite: JPN 100 or equivalent. LEC.

JPN 104. Elementary Japanese I. 5 Hours U / F1.

Three hours of lecture, three hours of drill per week. Acquisition of basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing). Not available for credit for students who have previously completed JPN 101. LEC.

JPN 108. Elementary Japanese II. 5 Hours U / F2.

Continuation of JPN 104. Prerequisite: JPN 101, JPN 104, or equivalent. LEC.

JPN 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Japanese. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

JPN 204. Intermediate Japanese I. 5 Hours U / F3.

Three hours of lecture, three hours of drill. Prerequisite: JPN 108 or equivalent. LEC.

JPN 206. Intermediate Japanese Conversation. 2-4 Hours U.

Enhancement of conversational ability at the intermediate level. Used primarily to accommodate transfer credits. Prerequisite: JPN 204 or equivalent. LEC.

JPN 208. Intermediate Japanese II. 5 Hours U / F4.

Continuation of JPN 204. Prerequisite: JPN 204. LEC.

JPN 226. Japanese in Context - Intermediate. 3 Hours U.

Supervised and individualized study and practice of language skills through direct experience in interviews and guided practical applications in various public settings in Japan. Some conventional classroom instruction in grammar included. Offered only during the Summer Institute in Hiratsuka, Japan. Prerequisite: Two semesters or the equivalent of Japanese language study. LEC.

JPN 233. Special Skills in Japanese: _____. 1-4 Hours U.

Instruction in special skills in Japanese, such as pronunciation, recognition of Chinese characters, comprehension of broadcast media, etc. at the freshman/sophomore level. Course work must be arranged through the office of KU Study Abroad and approved by the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

JPN 306. Advanced Japanese Conversation I. 2 Hours H/W / FP.

Intensive practice of communicative skills at the advanced level. Prerequisite: JPN 208 or equivalent. LEC.

JPN 310. Advanced Japanese Conversation II. 2 Hours H/W / FP.

Continuation of JPN 306. LEC.

JPN 326. Japanese in Context - Advanced. 3 Hours U / FP.

Supervised and individualized study and practice of language skills through direct experience in interviews and guided practical applications in various public settings in Japan. Some conventional classroom instruction in grammar and usage. Offered only during the Summer Institute in Hiratsuka, Japan. Prerequisite: Four semesters or the equivalent of Japanese language study. LEC.

JPN 333. Special Skills in Japanese: _____. 1-4 Hours U.

Instruction in special skills in Japanese, such as pronunciation, recognition of Chinese characters, comprehension of broadcast media, etc. at the junior/senior level. Course work must be arranged through the office of KU Study Abroad and approved by the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

JPN 386. Advanced Japanese Conversation III. 1-3 Hours U / FP.

Instruction in discussion in formal contexts and speech making. Prerequisite: JPN 504 or equivalent. LEC.

JPN 498. Directed Readings in Japanese. 1-4 Hours H/W / FP.

Readings in Japanese on a subject selected by a student with the advice and direction of the instructor. Individual meetings and reports. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND.

JPN 504. Advanced Modern Japanese I. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

Readings in selected modern Japanese texts on various topics: history, education, language, society, business, and literature. Meets three hours per week. Prerequisite: JPN 208 or equivalent. LEC.

JPN 508. Advanced Modern Japanese II. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

Continuation of JPN 504. Prerequisite: JPN 504 or equivalent. LEC.

JPN 509. Business Japanese. 3 Hours U / FP.

Study of Japanese language especially appropriate to business situations. Although the course emphasizes developing conversational ability, the primary focus is on strengthening reading and writing in the specialized area. The course includes discussion of non-verbal aspects of Japanese business practices as well. Prerequisite: The first semester of third-year Japanese or the equivalent. LEC.

JPN 542. Introduction to Classical Japanese I. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

Introductory grammar and readings in classical Japanese texts. Prerequisite: JPN 508. LEC.

JPN 544. Introduction to Classical Japanese II. 3 Hours H / FP.

Continued readings of classical Japanese texts, on the intermediate and advanced level. Introduction to the elements of kambun (Sino-Japanese) and sorobun (epistolary) styles. Prerequisite: JPN 542 or equivalent. LEC.

JPN 562. Modern Japanese Texts I. 3 Hours AE61 / H/W / FP.

Readings and interpretation of modern Japanese texts from various fields. Continued study of the language in the form of oral discussion and written reports. Prerequisite: JPN 508. LEC.

JPN 564. Modern Japanese Texts II. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

A continuation of JPN 562. Prerequisite: JPN 562 or equivalent. LEC.

JPN 569. Advanced Business Japanese. 3 Hours U / FP.

This course strengthens reading and writing skills and continues developing conversational ability. It assumes a higher level of competency in Japanese than JPN 509 and includes both verbal and non-verbal aspects of Japanese business practices. Prerequisite: Completion of third-year Japanese or equivalent. LEC.

JPN 598. Readings in: _____. 1-3 Hours H/W / FP.

Students will read selections from materials on a given topic or topics. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: JPN 564 or permission of instructor. IND.

JPN 690. Seminar in: _____. 1-3 Hours H/W / FP.

Varying topics with varying prerequisites. LEC.

JPN 801. Directed Readings and Research in Japanese. 1-4 Hours / FP.

Advanced language training for the study of Japanese sources in the humanities or social science field of the student. Prerequisite: JPN 564 or consent of instructor. RSH.

JPN 880. Advanced Japanese Research Materials. 2 Hours / FP.

A detailed examination of various Japanese language reference works and research materials. Emphasis will be placed on the use of different types of reference works to carry out research strategies. Prerequisite: JPN 508 or equivalent and JPN 580. LEC.

KOR 104. Elementary Korean I. 5 Hours U / F1.

Five hours of class and two hours of drill in the spoken language each week. Grammar and readings in selected texts. LEC.

KOR 108. Elementary Korean II. 5 Hours U / F2.

Continuation of KOR 104. Prerequisite: KOR 104. LEC.

KOR 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Korean. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

KOR 204. Intermediate Korean I. 5 Hours U / F3.

Five hours of class and two hours of spoken drill. Readings in selected texts in modern Korean. Prerequisite: KOR 108 or equivalent. LEC.

KOR 208. Intermediate Korean II. 5 Hours U / F4.

Continuation of KOR 204. Prerequisite: KOR 204. LEC.

KOR 498. Directed Readings in Korean. 1-4 Hours H/W / FP.

Readings in Korean on a subject selected by a student with the advice and direction of the instructor. Individual meetings and reports. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND.

KOR 504. Advanced Modern Korean I. 4 Hours H/W / FP.

Readings in and discussion of selected modern Korean texts on various topics: history, literature, society, and language. Prerequisite: KOR 208 or equivalent. LEC.

KOR 508. Advanced Modern Korean II. 4 Hours H/W / FP.

Readings and analysis of modern or contemporary texts from various fields. Includes oral discussion and written essays. Prerequisite: KOR 504 or equivalent. LEC.

KOR 562. Modern Korean Texts I. 1-5 Hours H / FP.

Readings and analysis of modern or contemporary texts from various fields. Includes oral discussion and written essays. Prerequisite: KOR 508 or equivalent. LEC.

KOR 564. Modern Korean Texts II. 1-5 Hours H / FP.

Continuation of KOR 562. Reading and analysis of modern or contemporary texts from various fields. Includes oral discussion and written essays. Prerequisite: KOR 562 or equivalent. LEC.

MONG 101. Elementary Mongolian I. 3 Hours U.

The first semester of Elementary Mongolian is designed to give the student basic communicative competency, including pronunciation and intonation, structure, and syntax. Effective oral and written communication is stressed. LEC.

MONG 102. Elementary Mongolian II. 3 Hours U.

A continuation of Elementary Mongolian I. Prerequisite: Elementary Mongolian I or the equivalent. LEC.

MONG 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Mongolian. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

TIB 101. Elementary Tibetan I. 3 Hours U / F1.

An introduction to the Tibetan language in both its literary and colloquial forms according to the Central Tibetan dialects. Four semesters of 3-credit Tibetan language courses fulfill the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement. LEC.

TIB 102. Elementary Tibetan II. 3 Hours U / F2.

A continuation of TIB 101. Prerequisite: TIB 101 or equivalent. Four semesters of 3 credit Tibetan language courses fulfill the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement. LEC.

TIB 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Tibetan. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

TIB 201. Intermediate Tibetan I. 3 Hours U / F3.

Continuation of TIB 102. Prerequisite: TIB 102 or equivalent. Four semesters of 3-credit Tibetan language courses fulfill the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement. LEC.

TIB 202. Intermediate Tibetan II. 3 Hours U / F4.

Continuation of TIB 201. Prerequisite: TIB 201 or equivalent. Four semesters of 3-credit Tibetan language courses fulfill the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement. LEC.

UYGR 101. Elementary Uyghur I. 3 Hours U / F1.

Uyghur is an important Central Asian Turkic language spoken by nine million people in China. The first semester is designed to give the student basic communicative competency, including pronunciation and intonation, structure, and syntax. Effective oral and written communication is stressed. LEC.

UYGR 102. Elementary Uyghur II. 3 Hours U / F2.

Continuation of UYGR 101. Prerequisite: UYGR 101 or the equivalent. LEC.

UYGR 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Uyghur. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

UYGR 201. Intermediate Uyghur I. 3 Hours U / F3.

Continuation of UYGR 102. Prerequisite: UYGR 102 or equivalent. LEC.

UYGR 202. Intermediate Uyghur II. 3 Hours U / F4.

Continuation of UYGR 201. Prerequisite: UYGR 201 or equivalent. LEC.


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